Health buffs share the BIZARRE fitness and wellness trends that will become all the craze in 2023

Over the past year, all kinds of fitness and wellness trends have risen in popularity – from the bizarre fad that saw people tanning their butts and genital area to the strange craze that involved walking backwards on a treadmill.

As 2022 comes to an end and 2023 approaches – many are left wondering, what new health trends are going to dominate next year? 

Ahead of the new year, DailyMail.com spoke to numerous personal trainers and health buffs – who shed some light on the workout activities and training techniques that they think will be in style throughout 2023, so you can get a head start on them.

DailyMail.com spoke to numerous personal trainers who shed some light on the workout activities and techniques that they think will be in style throughout 2023 (stock image)

One workout coach says he thinks an odd muscle-building method that sees people restriction the blood flow to their extremities by using a tourniquet will be the biggest thing in 2023, while another explained why cold plunges will likely spike in popularity next year.

From an injection that can heal joint pain and improve skin condition to an infrared technique that can boost testosterone, here’s all the fitness and wellness trends that you can expect to become all the craze during 2023, according to health and gym professionals – as well as which ones you should try and which you should avoid.

Bizarre new trend that sees people restricting the blood flow to their extremities will likely rise in popularity next year

According to New York personal trainer Kevin Richardson, a muscle-building technique known as Blood Flow Restriction training is going to become all the craze in 2023 (stock image)

According to New York personal trainer Kevin Richardson, a muscle-building technique known as Blood Flow Restriction training is going to become all the craze in 2023 (stock image)

The strange method involves applying pressure to an extremity, often using something like a tourniquet, to 'restrict blood flow' on the muscles you're training (stock image)

The strange method involves applying pressure to an extremity, often using something like a tourniquet, to ‘restrict blood flow’ on the muscles you’re training (stock image)

According to Kevin Richardson, a personal trainer based in New York, a muscle-building technique known as Blood Flow Restriction (BFR) training is going to become all the craze in 2023.

'Look out for folks with tight bands around their arms and legs working out next to you in 2023,' Kevin (seen) told DailyMail.com

‘Look out for folks with tight bands around their arms and legs working out next to you in 2023,’ Kevin (seen) told DailyMail.com

The strange method involves applying pressure to an extremity, often using something like a tourniquet, to ‘restrict blood flow’ on the muscles you’re training.

‘What I have seen gaining in popularity is Blood Flow Restriction training whereby a tourniquet is used to restrict blood flow in the muscles being trained,’ he told DailyMail.com recently.

‘Some studies have shown it increases the muscle mass, strength, and endurance – even when training with lighter loads. 

‘Several vendors have picked up on the trend and I’ve been told that some of the specialized tourniquets for arms are often sold out as the demand is so high.

‘So look out for folks with tight bands around their arms and legs working out next to you in 2023.’ 

While Kevin called the trend ‘a bit on the bizarre side,’ he said it has ‘evidence-based backing,’ but added that it’s important to do in ‘short’ increments.

According to APTA.Org, BFR training ‘can help patients to make greater strength training gains while lifting lighter loads, thereby reducing the overall stress placed on the limb.’

MikeReinold.com added that the benefit of the training method is that it allows someone to ‘exercise with lower intensity, but, still have the benefits of high-intensity training.’

People are going to focus more on long-term health – rather than short-term results in 2023 

Alexandre Folaci said he expects to see people focusing on doing things that improve their long-term health rather than exercises that give them short-term results (stock image)

Alexandre Folaci said he expects to see people focusing on doing things that improve their long-term health rather than exercises that give them short-term results (stock image)

Alexandre (seen) said people can put a 'protocol in place' when they're young that can help them when you're older - and he expects many people to start paying attention to that in 2023

Alexandre (seen) said people can put a ‘protocol in place’ when they’re young that can help them when you’re older – and he expects many people to start paying attention to that in 2023

Alexandre Folaci, a personal trainer who has coached everyone from A-list celebrities to royal family members, told DailyMail.com that he expected to see a rise in people focusing on doing things that improve their long-term health rather than exercises that give them short-term results next year – something he’s seen become popular among his own clients in recent months.

‘My vision for [my clients] is for them to be able to live up to 120 years old and still be able to run, lift weight, and move normally even when they’re old,’ he told DailyMail.com.

Men's Journal listed lateral band walks (seen), neutral-grip dumbbell bench presses, suspension trainer rowing, calf extension or leg presses, kettlebell swinging, alligator crawls and farmer's walks as some of the best longevity training methods

Men’s Journal listed lateral band walks (seen), neutral-grip dumbbell bench presses, suspension trainer rowing, calf extension or leg presses, kettlebell swinging, alligator crawls and farmer’s walks as some of the best longevity training methods

‘A lot of people now, when they’re 65, they can’t even move anymore, they’re walking with a cane, they’re in terrible pain everywhere.’

He explained that people can put a ‘protocol in place’ when they’re young that can help them when you’re older – and he expects many people to start paying attention to that throughout 2023.

‘This is really becoming more and more popular, more trendy,’ he continued. ‘If you do the right things you can really push your life expectancy way beyond 100 years old.’

Men’s Journal listed lateral band walks, neutral-grip dumbbell bench presses, suspension trainer rowing, calf extension or leg presses, kettlebell swinging, alligator crawls, and farmer’s walks as some of the best longevity training methods. 

Alexandre added that you can also add ’20-30 years to your life’ by eating healthy, sleeping enough, keeping your brain active, and avoiding drugs and alcohol. 

Cold plunges and showers may become the hottest new trend in 2023 

Alexandre also predicted that cold plunges - a method that involves you immersing yourself in cold water - may also become a popular trend next year (stock image)

Alexandre also predicted that cold plunges – a method that involves you immersing yourself in cold water – may also become a popular trend next year (stock image)

Alexandre also predicted that cold plunges – a method that involves you immersing yourself in cold water – may also become a popular trend next year.

According to the trainer (seen), there's a bunch of health benefits that can come from something as simple as taking a freezing cold shower, so he expects to see more and more people doing it throughout 2023

According to the trainer (seen), there’s a bunch of health benefits that can come from something as simple as taking a freezing cold shower, so he expects to see more and more people doing it throughout 2023

According to the trainer, there’s a bunch of health benefits that can come from something as simple as taking a freezing cold shower, so he expects to see more and more people doing it throughout 2023.

‘When you’re in the cold, your entire cardiovascular system shrinks, all your arteries get much thinner,’ he explained. 

‘It pushes the blood out of your muscles and this helps you flush out toxins, pain, and inflammation. 

‘In terms of pain relief and muscle healing, this helps a lot. It can accelerate the healing process of an injury five to two times. It also boosts your immune system.’

In addition to its physical benefits, the coach added that it can also have a huge  positive impact on your mindset.

‘Some people like to do it first thing in the morning because they say it’s the hardest thing they have to do during their day, so once they get over it, everything else will be easier in their day,’ he added. ‘It has a mind-strengthening element to it.’ 

In addition to its physical benefits, the coach added that it can also have a huge positive impact on your mindset (stock image)

In addition to its physical benefits, the coach added that it can also have a huge positive impact on your mindset (stock image)

TheColdPlunge.com echoed these sentiments and added that it can also help ‘boost daily energy,’ as well as give you a much-needed ‘pick me up.’ 

‘Sports medicine has utilized cold water therapy for years, to help the active recovery of your muscles,’ the publication explained. 

‘Being immersed in cold water stimulates leukocytes, the white blood cells that help fight off sicknesses.

‘It also causes the lymphatic system to contract, forcing fluid through the lymph nodes. 

‘This process aids in detoxing the body and strengthening your immune system. A study has shown to substantially lower upper respiratory tract infections.’

It’s also said to ‘increase your baseline dopamine, reduce depression, improve overall mood, dramatically reduce inflammation, and help with chronic pain.’ 

High intensity resistance training will be in next year, while long cardio sessions will be out

Kevin added that another thing he expects to rise in popularity next year is high intensity resistance training - also known as HIRT - rather than long cardio sessions (stock image)

Kevin added that another thing he expects to rise in popularity next year is high intensity resistance training – also known as HIRT – rather than long cardio sessions (stock image)

Kevin added that another thing he expects to rise in popularity next year is high intensity resistance training – also known as HIRT – rather than long cardio sessions.

According to Technogym.com, HIRT involves using short, intense periods of resistance training in a row without resting.

Kevin pointed out that it allows you ‘build muscle, increase strength, and lose weight’ while not taking up much of your time.

‘HIRT continues to build in terms of popularity … It has a training volume of only 10 minutes three times a week,’ he explained. 

‘High intensity resistance training has helped hundreds of men and women realize their fitness goals in less time. 

‘And with the number one excuse for not training being lack of time, the idea of only needing a half hour a week to achieve and maintain a high level of physical fitness continues to be the fastest growing trend among everyone from celebrities to CEOs.

‘It’s how I train and it’s how I have trained my clients for the past 31 years and it’s hard to argue with so many years of success stories.’

Kevin (seen) pointed out that it allows you 'build muscle, increase strength, and lose weight' while not taking up much of your time

Kevin (seen) pointed out that it allows you ‘build muscle, increase strength, and lose weight’ while not taking up much of your time

Fitness guru Anna Kaiser, from New York, warned against replacing cardio with HIRT. Instead, she suggested combining the two (stock image)

Fitness guru Anna Kaiser, from New York, warned against replacing cardio with HIRT. Instead, she suggested combining the two (stock image)

Alexandre agreed, telling DailyMail.com that he’s seen more and more people opting to workout at home rather than going to the gym recently – something he expects to continue throughout 2023.

'Cardio is incredibly important for heart health,' Anna (seen) said. 'Elevating your heart rate at least 30 minutes a day... is incredibly important'

‘Cardio is incredibly important for heart health,’ Anna (seen) said. ‘Elevating your heart rate at least 30 minutes a day… is incredibly important’

‘Fifteen-minute workouts with no equipment have been on the rise,’ he said, adding that things like animal crawls, which are easy to do from the comfort of your own home, are likely to take over next year.

Fitness guru Anna Kaiser, from New York, also told DailyMail.com: ‘I see a rise in short, low intensity strength workouts and a drop in daily cardio.’

But she warned against replacing cardio with HIRT. Instead, she suggested combining the two.

‘Cardio is incredibly important for heart health,’ she added. 

‘Elevating your heart rate at least 30 minutes a day (especially if we find ourselves seated for work the majority of the day) is incredibly important. 

‘With the rise of the digital era, our lifestyles have become much more sedentary, making cardio even more important for long-term health.’

Prepare for a rise in hyaluronic acid injections, which improve joint injuries, cure skin conditions and help with hair loss

Alexander also said he suspects that hyaluronic acid injections - a chemical used to treat joint injuries, which can also improve skin and hair quality - are going to soar in 2023 (stock image)

Alexander also said he suspects that hyaluronic acid injections – a chemical used to treat joint injuries, which can also improve skin and hair quality – are going to soar in 2023 (stock image)

Alexander also said he suspects that hyaluronic acid injections are going to soar in 2023.

While the chemical is normally used to treat joint injuries, he highlighted a series of other things it can be used for.

‘It’s like putting oil in rusty gears. If you put hyaluronic acid in arthritic joints, it will bring back some [liquid] in your joints and make it easier with less pain and inflammation,’ he shared. 

‘It’s become more and more popular [to treat injuries], but people also use it for skin treatment and hair loss, they use it for a lot of other things.’

MayoClinic.org reported that hyaluronic acid is ‘similar to a substance that occurs naturally in the joints,’ so it works as a ‘lubricant and shock absorber in the joints and helps them to work properly.’

EmpireMedicalTraining.com added that it also helps to stimulate the body’s production of ‘natural collagen,’ which ‘adds volume to the skin and smooths or erases age-related lines and wrinkles.’ 

Biohacking treatments like infrared, compression boots and oxygen chambers will be all the craze in 2023

Anna (seen) predicted that more and more wellness boutiques and fitness centers will add 'recovery and biohacking options like infrared, compression boots, and oxygen chambers'

Anna (seen) predicted that more and more wellness boutiques and fitness centers will add ‘recovery and biohacking options like infrared, compression boots, and oxygen chambers’

Something known as red-light therapy - a treatment that uses low wavelength red light - became a hot topic earlier this year, and Anna thinks it will grow in popularity (stock image)

Something known as red-light therapy – a treatment that uses low wavelength red light – became a hot topic earlier this year, and Anna thinks it will grow in popularity (stock image)

Anna predicted that more and more wellness boutiques and fitness centers will add ‘recovery and biohacking options like infrared, compression boots, oxygen chambers and cryotherapy’ throughout 2023.

Biohacking is the ‘practice of making small changes to your lifestyle to create incremental improvements to your overall well-being,’ according to InfaredSauna.com.

Something known as red-light therapy – a treatment that uses low wavelength red light – became a hot topic earlier this year when Tucker Carlson revealed that he uses the method to increase testosterone.

At the time, many people shunned the technique, but Anna thinks it will become widely accepted over the next year.

In addition, she said she thinks compression boots – which help boost circulation, improve lymphatic function, release muscle tension, increase mobility and eliminate soreness – as well as oxygen chambers will become the next big thing.

Alexandre said he also sees oxygen chambers rising in popularity next year. He told DailyMail.com, 'Oxygen chambers on the rise up' (stock image)

Alexandre said he also sees oxygen chambers rising in popularity next year. He told DailyMail.com, ‘Oxygen chambers on the rise up’ (stock image)

Alexandre said he also sees oxygen chambers rising in popularity next year. He told DailyMail.com: ‘Oxygen chambers on the rise up. 

‘The more I have been learning about longevity, the more I have been seeing other experts in the field mentioning oxygen chambers so it’s a consensus in the industry.’ 

While using an oxygen chamber, you breathe ‘pure air in a pressurized environment,’ according to the MayoClinic.org

‘In a hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber, the air pressure is increased two to three times higher than normal air pressure,’ it reported.

‘Under these conditions, your lungs can gather much more oxygen than would be possible breathing pure oxygen at normal air pressure. 

‘This extra oxygen helps fight bacteria. It also triggers the release of substances called growth factors and stem cells, which promote healing.’ 

Expect to see people turning to dance-based workouts next year 

Anna told DailyMail.com that she thinks 2023 will see a rise in people turning to dance-based workouts - like Zumba - since they're more fun and create a sense of 'community' (stock image)

Anna told DailyMail.com that she thinks 2023 will see a rise in people turning to dance-based workouts – like Zumba – since they’re more fun and create a sense of ‘community’ (stock image)

Anna told DailyMail.com that she thinks 2023 will see a rise in people turning to dance-based workouts – like Zumba – since they’re more fun and create a sense of ‘community.’

‘There will be a focus on fitness for mental health,’ she theorized. ‘Dance workouts are rising in popularity due to the happy factor and community that they create.’

Piedmont.org reported that you can burn 600 to 1,000 calories from a one-hour Zumba workout.

It added that it ‘tones your entire body’ by ‘targeting lots of different muscle groups at once’ while getting your heart rate up. 

'There will be a focus on fitness for mental health,' she theorized. 'Dance workouts are rising in popularity due to the happy factor and community that they create' (stock image)

‘There will be a focus on fitness for mental health,’ she theorized. ‘Dance workouts are rising in popularity due to the happy factor and community that they create’ (stock image)

It also pointed out that the more people ‘enjoy their workout routine,’ the more likely they will be to ‘stick with it.’

‘Many people say they have so much fun dancing that they forget they’re actually exercising,’ the outlet added.

‘Turning your attention to dance, and away from the daily grind, is also a great way to relieve stress.

‘Studies show that exercise is very effective at reducing fatigue, improving alertness and concentration, and enhancing overall cognitive function.’